Tag Archives: lebanese blogger

Le Brio: What A Cunt

I unfortunately missed the premiere organized by Empire on the 5th of March; I got to watch Le Brio last night. The movie theatre had 6 people (including us), I understand it was a Monday – so I won’t judge.

 

Le Brio simply tends to increase your IQ – what every other (probably sold out) movie in the theatres does not do.

 

Synopsis: Neïla Salah grew up in Créteil and dreams of becoming a lawyer. Registered at the great Parisian university of Assas, she confronts from the first day to Pierre Mazard, professor known for his provocations and his slippages. To redeem himself a conduct, the latter agrees to prepare Neïla for the prestigious contest of eloquence. At the same time cynical and demanding, Pierre could become the mentor she needs … Still, they must both overcome their prejudices.

 

Those lucky among us know their dream.

Life is full of opportunities.

Most of us though fear failure, so we live a safe life – then shift the blame onto every human, creature, and stereotype we can find to hide our cowardness towards what makes our souls cry from happiness.

 

If this reality is too harsh for you, try to have Pierre Mazard as a dream mentor.

What a cunt – one that we all need in order to slap ourselves in the face and wake up from our prolonged procrastination.

 

Neila is an Arab, an ambitious one.

Her lips are not bottoxed, her clothes do not reveal her clit, her dream is not gaining followers on instagram – but ofcourse she does not represent us Arab women; she has sex with her boyfriend.

 

So please, make me a favor and do not watch this movie.
(I’m using one of Mr. Mazard’s strategies, I mean go watch it)

Both characters help each other get what they want from life – who needs to toughen up and see that. No one. Duh.

(It’s a must watch) 

Let me know if you need a plus one, I have some friends I don’t feel like hanging out with.

(I would watch it again)

 

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Keep Walking Jane

After the marvelous Johnnie Walker Lebanese campaign “The Resourceful Don’t Wait” and the great keepwalkinglebanon initiative, Johnnie Walker acknowledges – this time not only our local pain but – women starting this March launching Jane Walker by Johnnie Walker. Eventhough this is an american movement #MonumentalWomen, I am hoping we get those Jane bottles shipped here!

I’m sure everyone can’t wait to drink you Jane! 😉 jane-walker-350-2018

The Johnnie Walker Black Label “Jane Walker Edition” debuts in March to coincide with Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day celebrations. In a multi-faceted attempt to support women in business, culture and politics, the company will donate $1 for each bottle produced to nonprofit campaigns like Monumental Women, a movement to erect a monument honoring America’s women suffragists in New York’s Central Park (there are currently 23 historical statues in the Park, none of which honors a real woman), and She Should Run, a group encouraging women to register and run for elected office.

Ref: http://www.adweek.com/brand-marketing/johnnie-walkers-transformative-jane-walker-campaign-will-support-gender-equality/

So both Lebanese Johnnie and Jane, keep walking 😉

M

Still Wanna Use Uber and Co?

Now that it’s out an Uber driver murdered Rebecca Dykes, a British diplomat in Beirut,  I am beyond shocked – and I feel the need to share this:

Around 6 months ago, I was contacted by Careem, another chauffeur driven car booking service operating in the Middle East, as an ‘influencer’ to promote their service on my social media:

I was riding with around 6 girls to Halat Sur Mer, the driver/ pilot commented that his boss doesn’t know he is a Careem chaufeur, so he doesn’t want to show in my posts. When I asked him where he works, he did not answer which got my girlfriends and I very uncomfortable.

Also, when he first picked me up, I recall he told me that I was more than 5 minutes late, so he turned off the map.

When we reached our destination at around 9 pm, I realized that I had left my wallet in his car. I called the pilot and told him that I need him to bring me back my wallet, he didn’t come back. Instead, he asked me to “order a Careem for my way back” . Not wanting to be rude, I agreed. I spent my whole night without a wallet. At around 1 am, I order a Careem. 5 minutes later it turned out, the pilot assigned wasn’t the same pilot who had driven me there. I cancelled the trip, and tried again. After 30 mins of trial and error, with my girlfriends and I waiting, I called the pilot and asked him to get my wallet right away. 

I called Careem’s marketing representative and apologized saying I don’t want to recommend this service to people who follow me. I deleted all the posts. The marketing rep told me it was my bad that I was late for pick-up, and couldn’t understand that I was actually more worried about the driver “turning off the map” and working “under cover”. 

25520044_10159704269960084_1563505195_nHowever, I still ordered uber sometimes both in Dubai and in Lebanon – since I thought it was an “international standard” service AND valet-fees-free. Now when I think about it; Even though most of uber pilots were nice and friendly, a lot of them were aggressive especially when it comes to “rating them a 5” or making them wait for 5 minutes – and by aggressive, I mean really aggressive. I have a rating of 4.88 on Uber, I had no idea that there was any Passenger rating till a rude pilot once mentioned that we both rate each other in a weird tone.

I also was once charged twice on my credit card for one Uber trip. I tried to contact the headquarters, the only way I could reach them was FACE BOOK MESSENGER – which is ABSURD! They promised a refund, I’m not sure they refunded my money. 

I remember when I was still in school, we had “3ammo George” my friends and I used to call. He was a dad, he was like our dad. We would call him at 5 am, he would get out of bed just to drive us all home. From THAT, to modern apps with complete psychos driving digital natives around the city,  is ridiculous! 

Being talkative and always questioning life, I ALWAYS asked every driver if he is both an Uber and Careem driver. 90% of them told me they were both, Uber and Careem drivers in Lebanon need to have a red plate/ public-driving license – so they’re limited and usually work with BOTH. It was a chance that this diplomat ordered an Uber, it could be either.

The reason I am writing this is to warn everyone, that I was NOW about to order an Uber (even though all of the above) to Mar Mkheyel, now I am just in shock and grateful I am ALIVE!!!!

Order a taxi from real reputable companies, NOT ON THE STREETS (my mobile phone was stolen from one of those once) “3ish ktir shouf ktir”; REAL COMPANIES who are always in contact with their supervisor, on walky talkies, THOSE!! Uber and such are just apps that take around 20%-30% of the fees you pay per ride. Even though they’re trendy and cool, they are simply NOT SAFE!

Or at least don’t ride with them before: 
1- Drivers cannot turn off maps!
2- Drivers are inspected especially for criminal records!
3- A 24/7 costumer service department answers complaints and not Facebook Messenger!

PS: Many UBER drivers were nice and extremely friendly and “fatherly”
Stay Safe Please!
M

Whatsup with @total? #TotalLibanRallyPaper

Total Lebanon arranged a Rally Paper last Sunday (November 19, 2017) where they invited 5 bloggers (@LeNajib from Blog Baladi, @NourKeirouz #chasingnour, @LebaneseCars, @JimmyGhazal, and myself @mayaacra) with their plus ones to solve the charades.

On every checkpoint, we were handed out a paper with questions about Total Gas Station & General Knowledge, a charade, and a challenge. Watch the video of what happened with Aya & I as we were trying to figure everything out!

Also found on What’s Up with Maya 

 

..القانون يحمي القويّ، الوحش، المُغتصِب

القانون لا يحمي المغفلين
فمن يحمي القانون؟

وكيف نُعرِّف المغَفّل… الاحمق؟
هل هو العاجز؟ المُتَّكل؟

المغفّل في ايامنا
هو الانسان الذي يُضرَب ويُهَدَّد
هو القلب الطيّب
هي الطفلة البريئة
هي المرأة الطموحة الساكتة الخائفة

القانون يحمي القويّ
الوحش
المُغتصِب
الغنيّ
المستغلّ الغير
المهدِّد

هذا هو قانوننا
قانون الغاب

صار وقته القانون يحمي من التحرش الجنسي
#mesh_basita
مش_بسيطة#

 

Photo & video credits : Emir Kreidie 


Currently, there exists no national legislation specifically confronting sexual harassment in Lebanon. To confront this lack of laws, a number of initiatives by civil society organizations and government entities have recently pushed for legal reform to address sexual harassment in public spaces and at the workplace. Within the last few years, draft laws criminalizing sexual harassment in public spaces and in the workplace have been prepared and submitted by various bodies, the latest of which is now pending voting by the parliament.

The KIP Project on Gender and Sexuality at the Olayan School of BusinessAmerican University of Beirut, and in partnership with the Office of the Minister of State for Women’s Affairs, launched the “Mesh Basita,” a national campaign that aims at highlighting the need for legislation around sexual harassment within the Lebanese landscape and mobilizing the general public’s opinion towards pushing for legal reform. While many often tend to downplay instances of harassment, suggesting that these are part of everyday social life, this campaign hopes to highlight the many forms harassment may take in an effort to draw attention to the fact that they are violations.

In order to confront the idea that sexual harassment is not a serious issue, “Mesh Basita” stands for the idea that sexual harassment is “not okay.” Offering a double meaning through a message of empowerment, it also suggests that the person is not naïve and that they are taking a stand against harassment. In doing so, the campaign ultimately aims to highlight the need for legislative reform around sexual harassment in Lebanon.

Women, Homosexuals, and Artists as Politicians in Lebanon – @theKIPProject

… following my Not Your Ashta Blogpost..

I was happy to be invited to the KIP Project this year held at the American University of Beirut (AUB), since I was extremely sick for the past week, I could only attend it on the 1st of April (I missed the first day).

*Whereas all the panelists truly inspired me and scratched my head, I will only mention those who somehow triggered my senses more than others.*

Panel (Highlighting Discrimination through Art & Media)

One of the panelists, Bahaa Harmouche, is a creative director and works on the stigmatized HIV Positive outcasts in our modern societies – more specifically the homosexual HIV Positive people in the Middle East. He speaks on behalf of them saying “Accept Us and Love Us, we are not your enemy.”

Homosexuality is still an extremely controversial issue in the Middle East where all religions completely reject it as being un-natural and devilish. Individuals are living an internal conflict day after day, especially those who belong to extremely religious families. HIV patients – often persecuted by (somewhat) hypocrites that mainly engage in the same actions they did, but were luckier to not contract such a fatal disease – victimize themselves due to their little awareness, education, and luck.

“The gay society is already marginalized in our societies. The homosexual HIV Positives are even marginalized in the gay society itself,” claimed Bahaa during his panel.

It was definitely the first time I hear such a panel – a taboo, an unspoken battle, and a condemned group by even the minority sub-culture – a courageous topic to address.

Heather Jaber, an independent researcher, discussed the fact that homosexuals are often portrayed in Lebanese series as depressed, and are sent or exiled to other countries. While this portrayal of reality has its positive aspect where it shows that these individuals are unaccepted in society, other questions arise like: why isn’t the media showing us the successful happy homosexuals in Lebanon as normal characters living with us everyday – and are WE  giving them the option of either living with depression, committing suicide, or unintentionally sending them to extreme exile? Why is the sexual orientation the only layer a character is described with in Lebanese cinema and why is homosexuality the only artifact that is leading gay characters into depression?


Panel (Marginalized Groups in the Lebanese Political Sphere)


Carmen Geha and Krystel Tabet shared with us the findings of their research of the little engagments of females in the political life. “Politics is masculine” she said, “women are usually brought up in Lebanon to be honest, thinking about the benefit of the community rather than personal benefit whereas men usually possess more ego, aspire to be powerful and are more interested in politics.” Other reasons discussed were the patriarchy of sectarianism and the (debatably) little resources of women, their little effectiveness in national institutions, and their less availability (since they are mostly also mothers and house wives).


Reem Saab’s research highlighted a slight difference in the degree of political voting among men vs women (men are more likely to vote by 1.2% than women) yet a rather great-low representation of women in politics, due to lack of interest, lower chances of employment, and lower education levels.


Nada Anid, representing the NGO Women In Front, shared with us her findings of Lebanon being ranked 180/187 (in Women Parliament Representation) and 143/144 (in Women Governmental Inclusion). She states that a better Quota of women will only happen under one condition: Real Political Will.


In addition to the absence of a Feminist Block and the misconception of the role of politics, one can not but note that the seats in the Lebanese Parliament are barely fitting our politicians that are almost devouring each other for one seat, what if a WOMAN was to take that seat? Unfortunately, giving a seat to a woman is regarded as more of a gentleman act than anything else in the Lebanese government.

Perhaps these issues are disregarded in oppose to what our country is facing these days, however there exists a definite misconception of the role of politics.

Women and activists are less likely to consider politics due to the global interests/lobbies that do not appeal to the interests of such individuals. However, the KIP Project reminded all its attendees that politics is not about Russia, USA, France, or the Middle East, it is about our daily life struggles.

The representation of labor in the syndicates and unions has a direct effect on the rights of the practitioners of a certain labor force. The municipalities are responsible for the concerns of its citizens and we (and our votes) are to be blamed for the traffic jam we are stuck in every day. The government is held responsible for the tax, the double-electricity, and our endless expenses. Politics is not whether Iran and USA are on in “tsingof” or “TGIF” mode. Politics is the daily stress or distress we live with every single day.

The panel  (Art as an Alternative Catalyst for Change In Lebanon) featuring the Kesserwany sisters reminded artists that usually have no interest in politics to address social change in their own creative way. Yes, even artists are responsible for fixing Lebanon, no one is exempted – not the women, not the homosexuals, and not the artists. We are all in this together.

I hope one day all Lebanese People find this as interesting as the numerous pointless memes circulating our useless whatsapp groups,
With Love!
M

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From the book Louder Than Hearts Poems – Zeina Hashem Beck Winner of the 2015 May Sarton New Hampshire Poetry Prize